Tag Archives: medical device translation

Stick ‘Em Up! Medical Devices As Weapons


Recently  the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles paid hackers $17,000 in Bitcoin to unlock their systems from so-called “ransomware” – malicious software that locked out hospital administrators from crucial medical records (read the story, here)

It’s not a long walk from hacking into hospital records to hacking into medical devices themselves. Over the past 2-3 years, a number of “white hat” hackers have demonstrated vulnerabilities in networked devices…including pacemakers, infusion pumps, and many more.

Security vulnerabilities may be introduced when software is translated (“localized”) into other languages. For this reason, it is critical to consider state-of-the-art software tools and robust testing as part of your overall localization effort.

TransPerfect Medical Device Solutions can help  – our localization tools are in use with 80% of the world’s large software developers and our dedicated testing facilities in Boulder, CO ensure the most rigorous post-localization scrutiny.

TransPerfect MDS – Software Testing QA

 

 

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Crimson Life Sciences Becomes Part of TransPerfect Medical Device Solutions

TP_MedicalDeviceSolutions_stacked_cmykOn Monday, 6/1, Crimson Life Sciences officially becomes part of  TransPerfect Medical Device Solutions. Here’s more information from the client notification:

You may be wondering: why the change? The language and content needs of the medical device industry have evolved significantly over the years, and the TransPerfect family of companies has met those changes by developing a wide range of services and technologies to meet the specific needs of device makers. A majority of our work now rests on integrated solutions that help clients reduce cost and risk through process automation and redesign, including:

  • Process Automation Technology
  • Labeling Automation Solutions
  • Validated XML Publishing Systems
  • Automated Website Localization
  • Software Design, Translation, Verification, and Testing
  • E-Learning Development and Localization
  • And more!

Throughout our 23 years in business, Crimson has come to be known as the most quality-focused translation provider in the industry. Our commitment to this goal has not changed, but our name now reflects our full range of integrated solutions for device makers.

It has been our great honor to work with our clients in the medical device industry for the past quarter-century. We look forward to providing innovative services, technologies, and systems as TransPerfect Medical Device Solutions.

 

 

Reports of Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

For years, the device industry has lamented declining VC investment, leading to a decrease in new-company formation, innovation and the like. Well, to paraphrase the popular Mark Twain misquote, “reports of the death of medical device venture investment have been greatly exaggerated” According to FierceMedicalDevices:

 “This year, medical device venture fundraising could actually increase for the first time since 2007. That’s driven by the increasingly connected healthcare environment. VCs are going wild for digital health, the promise of convergence between our healthcare systems and all the mobile, cloud, wireless and wearable technologies you could possibly imagine.”

 This convergence of multiple disciplines requires a solutions approach to content management and translations – a key reason that EnCompass was created. Different content types require different treatment in translation, e.g. medical resources for anatomical content, computer/IT resources for software-related content…and testing/verification services for the finished device software.

VC investment in the device industry is focused on digital health – and these new software/hardware/network devices require an integrated approach to content management and linguistic QC that spans a number of technologies and disciplines – not just medical/anatomical. Fortunately, TransPerfect Medical Device Solutions has all the services and technologies that you need to ensure linguistic accuracy and system quality and compliance.

Don’t Get Yanukovych’d

Yanukovych_WEB-readyShortly after Yanukovych was ousted as Ukraine’s President, the Ukrainian Parliament repealed a recent law allowing the use of “regional languages” like Russian.  Language has long been been tied up with issues of nationalism and national identity and can often be something of a “land mine” (not to be indelicate in the current, tense, situation).

If you think that these types of language sensitivities don’t apply to the medical device industry, you’re wrong. On one recent client visit, I heard a story of how the company had sent Russian instructions to a location in Estonia…not realizing the reaction that it might provoke (after the Soviet domination of the Baltic States). The result? Even though an exemption could have been written, the client demanded everything in Estonian and at a significant cost. The moral of the story? Know the political implications of your language choices when doing business abroad.

A Localization Within a Localization

fortune-cookie-1

For everyone who wrestles with marketing translation (sorry, localization), you may appreciate this story (and short video) from NPR.

Turns out, many Americans living in China miss really good Chinese food…well, Chinese food as they remember it in America, anyway.  So, a couple of enterprising Chinese Americans opened Fortune Cookie in Shanghai – a restaurant serving up the Americanized form of Chinese food to US expats and curious Chinese.

Aside from the humorous aspects of this story (the Chinese staff had only seen the white take-out boxes in Hollywood movies, so took pictures when they first saw them in real life), it does hold a lesson for medical device marketers, and the lesson is this:  sometimes a US-centric message, if it’s the right one, can be adapted and succeed quite nicely in the local market. Not everything has to be created whole-cloth, in-country.

The Most Popular Post Ever

According to Crimson Audit, Review, & Consulting, in over 4 years, their most popular post (by far) has been this:  Labeling Errors are Leading Cause of Device Recall.

With the growing interest in XML publishing in the medical device industry, this information is now more relevant than ever.  Our Astoria and Vasont divisions provide validated systems for device makers like GE Healthcare, Medtronic, and J&J because these systems can reduce localization costs by 40%…but, as you might guess, this level of savings comes at a cost.

The strength of these systems is that they manage content in a “single source” – there is one version of a content chunk (topic) which is reused in other publications or channels. However, if the content contains an error (in the English source or translated target), that error gets replicated out multiple times – this is a classic “propagation risk” and it has very real implications for labeling accuracy and device recall.

The best solution is also a classic: the quality systems principle of “quality at the source”. For translation, it means that appropriate risk management must be employed to produce XML -based translated content. This not only minimizes propagation risk, it also reduces the risk of device recall due to labeling errors.

Iron Man Offers Lessons for Device Makers in China

Iron Man China

It’s not often we get to point to a comic book character for marketing lessons, but the recent release of Iron Man 3 provides important food for thought for device manufacturers.

China’s movie market is big…and quickly getting bigger. With 10 new screens opening every day and box office revenues rising 30% in 2012, China recently edged out Japan to become the world’s #2 movie market. In fact, China could surpass the U.S. as the world’s largest market within 5 years. So, it’s not surprising that Hollywood took the unusual step of modifying (“localizing” in translation jargon) the content of the movie. What is surprising is the extent of the modification/localization: “Tony [Stark] doesn’t have to do this alone…China can help.” Specific content, filmed with Chinese actors in China, was added in a nod to the importance of local taste.

This narrative might sound familiar to device makers. According to PharmaLive, China is expected to pass Japan as the world’s #2 medical device market between 2018 and 2020 and represent 25% of the world market by 2050. And, just like in the movies, China is demanding more localized content – especially for device marketing.

Our Crimson division has been very active in dealing with the challenges of translating device marketing content – you can read an informative post here: http://crimsonlanguage.wordpress.com/2013/01/29/something-fishy-about-device-marketing-translation/

Sometimes, however, manufacturers may want to opt out of the traditional “translation” paradigm. Instead of the endless back-end-forth with reviewers, manufacturers might instead consider producing content in-country that is custom-developed for the local market. Not translated, but created locally. Call this the “Iron Man” strategy.

More costly than simple translation or localization, the Iron Man strategy requires a strong relationship with a local advertising agency. It also requires back-translation of the finished piece in order to assure requisite corporate control. This can be facilitated by technology tools like the GlobalLink Translation & Review Portal.

Whether you’re interested in translation, localization, or the go-local, Iron Man strategy, EnCompass has tools and strategies to get you to success.